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Sleep News Monthly || March 2018 Special Edition: Sleep Apnea

This special edition focuses on all forms of sleep apnea, its treatment, and other challenges

To honor World Sleep Day, SHC is focusing several weeks of curation on the important topic of sleep apnea: what it is, how to test for it, what its treatments are, how it impacts special populations like women and children, and much more.


Sleep Apnea special edition sidebar graphic March 2018

 

SleepNews Monthly is SHC’s monthly effort to showcase the latest in sleep health links culled from recently published sleep health news.
Topics are thematic and categorized in newspaper-like “sections” for your convenience in scanning. SHC does not publish every single link it finds, but vets what is available online to provide the most reliable and up-to-date information for you.
Who is this monthly news curation for? Note our subtitle: “News that Everyone Can Use… Because Everyone Can Use Some Sleep.” SleepNews Monthly is for ordinary people, sleep-disordered patients, families, all kinds of healthcare practitioners, medical students at every level, policymakers, trend trackers.
If you have thoughts about any of these topics, themes, or headlines, feel free to share them in the comments below! We love to hear from readers! —The Curator

 


Note: Some links lead to content requiring access through a paywall. These obstacles are beyond our control. Links to abstracts are included here regardless, so the general public can still get a basic understanding and awareness of the research being done in these arenas.

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SLEEP APNEA

SIGNS, SYMPTOMS & CAUSES

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Dateline: March 14, 2018 from About Lawsuits

Testosterone Therapy Linked to Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk: Study

Researchers with Harvard Medical School published a study late last month in the urology medical journal BJU International, which downplayed concerns over testosterone heart risks, but also discovered an association between the use of the medications and an increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 14, 2018 from Why We Snore

If Your Patient’s Insomnia Drugs Are Failing, They Probably Have Sleep Apnea

In a recent article, about 90% of those who didn’t see results from their insomnia drugs actually had sleep apnea.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 12, 2018 from Cape Gazette

Three Common Sleep Apnea Myths Debunked

In recognition of Sleep Awareness Week, Pulmonologist Brian J. Walsh, DO, who serves as the medical director of Bayhealth Sleep Center, Smyrna, debunks common sleep apnea myths and misconceptions and shares other insight into sleep’s role in overall well-being.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 9, 2018 from Mayo Clinic

Sleep Apnea: Symptoms and Causes

Sleep apnea can affect anyone, even children. But certain factors increase your risk of sleep apnea.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 9, 2018 from Sleep and Breathing

The relationship of the uvula with snoring and obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review

This study conducted a systematic review of the international literature for research describing the measurable characteristics of the uvula (i.e., size, length, width) and any association with snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 28, 2018 from The Detroit News

Doc: Reader nails Cheyne-Stokes breathing description

Advice column: “Dear Dr. Roach: My wife of 52 years is 71 and has developed what I assume is a problem with her breathing when she sleeps. During some periods of sleep, she starts taking a rhythmic set of breaths. There usually are four deep breaths followed by four shallow breaths. Each set of the four breaths decreases in intensity, and the shallow breaths are barely recognizable. She also has developed tics in her arms and legs. Needless to say, this frightens me.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 21, 2018 from eos Dental Sleep

Most Common Reasons to See a Sleep Apnea Specialist

Sleep apnea is a common, frustrating condition that can develop for a number of reasons. Unfortunately, it’s rarely something you can handle yourself. Sleep apnea has two forms, obstructive and central, and both have short- and long-term affects on your health and quality of life. Luckily a sleep apnea specialist can identify the best treatment for you and help you start getting the rest you need.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 21, 2018 from The Irish News

Ask The Dentist: How to cope with sleep apnea

Indicators that you may have OSA are breathing through your mouth, daytime sleepiness, nasal-sounding speech, snoring, gasping for breath during sleep, sleep walking and night terrors.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 21, 2018 from Reader’s Digest

13 Signs Your Sleep Apnea Could Be Killing You (slideshow)

Michael J. Breus, PhD, aka The Sleep Doctor, shares the negative effects of undiagnosed sleep apnea.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 19, 2018 from Reader’s Digest

9 Silent Signs of Sleep Apnea You’re Ignoring (slideshow)

Loud snoring isn’t the only symptom of sleep apnea. If you notice any of the following less obvious sleep apnea symptoms, talk to your doctor.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 1, 2018 from SLEEP

Cardiopulmonary coupling spectrogram as an ambulatory clinical biomarker of sleep stability and quality in health, sleep apnea, and insomnia

Ambulatory tracking of sleep and sleep pathology is rapidly increasing with the introduction of wearable devices. The objective of this study was to evaluate a wearable device which used novel computational analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG), collected over multiple nights, as a method to track the dynamics of sleep quality in health and disease.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: January 2, 2018 from SLEEP

Changing Faces of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Treatment Effects by Cluster Designation in the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort

Distinct clinical phenotypes of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been identified: Disturbed Sleep, Minimally Symptomatic, and Sleepy. Determining whether these phenotypes respond differently to standard treatment helps us to create a foundation for personalized therapies. We compared responses to positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy in these clinical OSA phenotypes.(click headline for more)

 

 


SLEEP APNEA

TESTING & DIAGNOSTICS

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Dateline: March 10, 2018 from American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Private insurance claims for sleep apnea rose steeply from 2014 to 2017

Private insurance claims with a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea grew 850 percent in the U.S. from 2014 to 2017, according to a press release from FAIR Health, a national, independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing transparency to health care costs and health insurance information.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 6, 2018 from EurekAlert!

Rural claim lines with sleep apnea diagnoses increased 911 percent from 2014 to 2017

From 2014 to 2017, private insurance claim lines with a diagnosis of sleep apneaa potentially serious disorder in which a person repeatedly stops and starts breathing while asleep—increased by 911 percent in rural America, according to FAIR Health, a national, independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing transparency to healthcare costs and health insurance information. In contrast, urban areas recorded an increase of 839 percent in the same time frame.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 19, 2018 from ItemLive.com

Swampscott dentist knows the drill on sleep apnea

Ronald Plotka, of North Shore Dentist, has been practicing in Swampscott for 48 years. In December of 2015, his office bought a Sirona Orthophos SL cone beam scan, or cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as it’s called in the medical field, which is estimated at $130,000. It has already helped him screen hundreds of patients for sleep apnea, a condition in which a person repeatedly stops breathing during sleep because of an obstructed airway.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 19, 2018 from WRAL

From snoring to apnea, sleep studies can help ailing snoozers

Sleep studies are simple. Participants come into a lab, get hooked up and go to bed. When sleepers in a study awake, the results will reveal why they can’t get the rest they need and gives the best solutions. For instance, patients with sleep apnea might get a recommendation for a C-PAP machine, an easy-to-use device that opens up a person’s airway passages.(click headline for more)

 

 

Dateline: February 10, 2018 from SLEEP

Determinants of sleepiness in obstructive sleep apnea

Significant interindividual variability in sleepiness is observed in clinical populations with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This phenomenon is only partially explained by the apnea–hypopnea index (AHI). Understanding factors that lead to sleepiness is critical to effective management of patients with OSA. We examined demographic and other factors associated with sleepiness in OSA.(click headline for more)

 

 


 

SLEEP APNEA

THERAPEUTICS & TECHNOLOGIES

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Dateline: March 14, 2018 from MedGadget

aerSleep System for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

TTP Ventus, UK-based developer of Disc Pump, a tiny, quiet, and very efficient pump, and Sommetrics, US-based creator of aerSleep negative-pressure treatment system for obstructive sleep apnea, teamed up to develop the slimmed-down tetherless aerSleep system. aerSleep has just recently been approved for marketing to patients in Canada.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 14, 2018 from PLOS One

Cerebral vasoreactivity in response to a head-of-bed position change is altered in patients with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can impair cerebral vasoreactivity and is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease. Unfortunately, an easy-to-use, non-invasive, portable monitor of cerebral vasoreactivity does not exist.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 14, 2018 from Sleep Review

American Dental Association Adopts Policy on Dentistry’s Role in Sleep-Disordered Breathing

The policy, written by the ADA Council on Dental Practice, is a result of an evidence brief on the use of oral appliances for sleep-breathing disorders, which was developed by the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs. The ADA’s governing body, the House of Delegates, reviewed and made comments for the policy, which were incorporated into the final draft before the association finally adopted it this past fall.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 14, 2018 from SleepyHEADCentral

Wellness Wednesday: A pacemaker for sleep apnea?

Implanted devices that help people breathe can be helpful, if expensive, for treating sleep apnea. However, for many, PAP therapy fails and oral appliance therapy isn’t indicated. This new technology might be the ticket for many with challenges treating their sleep breathing disorders.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 13, 2018 from High Altitude Medicine & Biology

Adaptive Servoventilation as Treatment for Central Sleep Apnea Due to High-Altitude Periodic Breathing in Nonacclimatized Healthy Individuals

Central sleep apnea (CSA) is common at high altitude, leading to desaturation and sleep disruption. We hypothesized that noninvasive ventilation using adaptive servoventilation (ASV) would be effective at stabilizing CSA at altitude. Supplemental oxygen was evaluated for comparison.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 8, 2018 from Sleep and Breathing

The use of oral appliances in obstructive sleep apnea: a retrospective cohort study spanning 14 years of private practice experience

The purpose of this study is to report outcomes of a board-certified dental sleep practitioner managing mild, moderate, and severe OSA using customized titratable MADs [mandibular advancement devices]. We hypothesize that patients will demonstrate a significant reduction in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) scores after adjusting their customized titratable MADs.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 7, 2018 from Sleep Review

Advanced Positive Airway Pressure Modes Show Promise for PTSD Patients with Comorbid Sleep Apnea

Many obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have a difficult time adhering to CPAP therapy because of expiratory pressure intolerance (EPI), according to a recent study that posits possible solutions.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 5, 2018 from American Association of Sleep Technologists

Here’s Why CPAP Adherence is So Critical

Untreated OSA has been associated with cardiovascular complications. CPAP therapy is found to improve cardiovascular disease outcomes and reduce elevated blood pressure. It reduces daytime sleepiness significantly in OSA patients and has been linked to daily functioning and memory improvements — all possibly attributed to better and longer sleep at night. CPAP therapy has also been shown to greatly improve executive function and verbal memory in some patients.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 3, 2018 from Sleep Review

For New CPAP Cleaner, Ozone Is a No-Go Zone

The 3B Lumin at-home mask and water chamber cleaner opts for ultraviolet light instead of activated oxygen. 3B Medical’s Alex Lucio explains why.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 28, 2018 from Center for Craniofacial & Dental Sleep Medicine via Oral Health

FDA Clears Innovative Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Disorders

By holding the lower jaw in a more comfortable position, the Meridian PM eliminates the potential jaw pain and changes in the patient’s bite often experienced with traditional oral appliance therapy. It effectively treats snoring, OSA and associated breathing symptoms by stabilizing the lower jaw and training the tongue to stay forward, maintaining a clear upper airway during sleep.(click headline for more)

 

• Dateline: February 27, 2018 from MedCityNews

Fitbit plans to submit sleep apnea, Afib detection tools for FDA clearance

Touching on the company’s work with the FDA and its participation in the digital health pre-certification pilot program, [CEO James] Park said the company plans to submit digital health tools centered on Afibrilliation and sleep apnea detection for clearance this year.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 26, 2018 from MobiHealth News

Kardian’s contactless monitoring system detects falls

Outside of detecting falls, the technology can monitor resting heart rate, breathing rate, and sleep apnea. The company said it can detect health risks like heart arrhythmia and prolonged deterioation of the sleep cycle as well.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 22, 2018 from Sleep Review

How Telemonitoring Improves Timeliness of Care—And Ultimately CPAP Adherence

Telemonitoring—using software to monitor an individual’s sleep therapy—is being used by physicians to make any needed adjustments to resolve issues before they snowball into patient nonadherence.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 22, 2018 from Surrey Now-Leader

Surrey SFU students win $35K for sleep apnea tech

A startup company created by SFU students has won big for its “sleep wearable” alternative to improve sleep apnea.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 21, 2018 from American Association for Respiratory Care

Big Ideas Theater, Episode 8: Adaptive Servo Ventilation and Central Sleep Apnea (video)

Jessica Schweller MS, RRT, RRT-SDS, RN, CNP opens this episode describing how central sleep apnea and obstructive sleep apnea differ and who they are more likely to affect. She explains that obstructive sleep apnea can affect anyone, while central sleep apnea tends to affect older individuals and those on medications. According to Schweller, central sleep apnea can ‘sneak up on patients because it can be asymptomatic.’ It also poses challenges to treatment, such as cost and the need to conduct multiple studies and tests. Working with servo ventilation for central sleep apnea patients results in having to see the patients more regularly.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 19, 2018 from Valpolife.com

Sleep Airway Solutions Offers Alternative Treatment for Sleep Apnea

With serious implications, treatment should be simple for those diagnosed. While the CPAP machine is a very popular option, many find it cumbersome when traveling and dislike the device during use. This is where Dr. Uzelac identified some of the strengths of oral devices to aid in sleep apnea.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 17, 2018 from SLEEP

Estimation of adaptive ventilation success and failure using polysomnogram and outpatient therapy biomarkers

Adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) devices provide anticyclic pressure support for the treatment of central and/or complex sleep apnea, including heart failure patients. Variability in responses in the clinic and negative clinical trials motivated assessment of standard and novel signal biomarkers for ASV efficacy.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 16, 2018 from Sleep and Breathing

Effects of CPAP therapy on cognitive and psychomotor performances in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea: a prospective 1-year study

We prospectively investigated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on long-term cognitive and psychomotor performances, and excessive daytime sleepiness in severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 16, 2018 from Sleep Review

Increasing Prevalence of Chronic Respiratory Diseases Driving Pulse Oximetry Market

Pulse oximetry is used for a number of indications such as endotracheal intubation, cardiac arrests, procedural sedation, asthma/COPD, respiratory complaints, acute respiratory distress syndrome, sleep disorders/sleep apnea, and shunts in cyanotic heart diseases.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 15, 2018 from Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Nonadherence to CPAP Associated With Increased 30-Day Hospital Readmissions

Nonadherence to CPAP is associated with increased 30-day all-cause and cardiovascular-cause readmission in patients with OSA.” … (click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 15, 2018 from Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Patient-Reported Outcomes in Older Adults With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treated With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy

Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is regarded as the gold standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults, outcomes in older patients are limited. This study examines the effect of CPAP therapy in older adults with OSA (older than 60 years) compared to younger adults (age 18 to 60 years) to inform the current standard of practice.” … (click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 14, 2018 from Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Characterization of Respiratory Events in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Using Suprasternal Pressure Monitoring

In obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) esophageal pressure (Pes) is the gold standard for measurement of respiratory effort, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) is considered an accepted measurement technique. However, the use of RIP could lead to limited accuracy in certain cases and therefore suprasternal pressure (SSP) monitoring might improve the reliability of OSA diagnosis. We aimed to use SSP for the visual characterization of respiratory events in adults and compared results to those obtained by RIP from polysomnography (PSG).(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 4, 2018 from Sleep Review

First US Commercial Case Using Remedē for Central Sleep Apnea Completed; Respicardia Appoints CEO

Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a serious breathing disorder that disrupts the normal breathing pattern during sleep and negatively affects quality of life and overall cardiovascular health. CSA results from the brain’s inability to send appropriate signals to the respiratory muscles to stimulate breathing. The remedē System is clinically proven to safely and effectively treat moderate to severe CSA in adult patients and improve quality of life.” … (click headline for more)

 

Dateline: January 25, 2018 from Clinical Research in Cardiology

Adaptive servo-ventilation [ASV] and sleep quality in treatment emergent central sleep apnea [TECSA] and central sleep apnea [CSA] in patients with heart disease and preserved ejection fraction [pEF]

In patients with heart disease and pEF, whose TECSA and CSA were treated with ASV, a significant reduction of AHI and arousal index as well as an increase of N3 and REM sleep was observed. Increase of sleep efficiency was significantly greater in TECSA compared to CSA.” … (click headline for more)

 

Dateline: January 17, 2018 from Alaska Sleep Disorder Clinic

What is the Difference Between CPAP and BiPAP Therapy?

BiPAP (also referred to as BPAP) stands for Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure, and is very similar in function and design to a CPAP machine (continuous positive airway pressure). Similar to a CPAP machine, A BiPAP machine is a non-invasive form of therapy for patients suffering from sleep apnea. Both machine types deliver pressurized air through a mask to the patient’s airways. The air pressure keeps the throat muscles from collapsing and reducing obstructions by acting as a splint. Both CPAP and BiPAP machines allow patients to breathe easily and regularly throughout the night.(click headline for more)

 

 


SLEEP APNEA

RELATED HEALTH CONDITIONS & COMORBIDITIES

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Dateline: March 12, 2018 from Anesthesia & Analgesia

Patients at High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Are at Increased Risk for Atrial Fibrillation After Cardiac Surgery: A Cohort Analysis (abstract)

Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) experience intermittent hypoxia, hypercarbia, and sympathetic activation during sleep, which increases risk for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and other cardiac arrhythmias. Whether patients with OSA experience increased episodes of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery is unclear.(click headline for more)

 

• Dateline: March 9, 2018 from Healio MedBlog

BLOG: CPAP and dry eye: A unique situation (commentary)

What made Lenora get excited is that she asked that critical ‘next’ question about his CPAP machine and whether it was leaking around the seal. He has a new kind of CPAP that only connects to the nose and pushes air directly into his nostrils. There was no leak that he could remember, but he was noticing a fluttering’ of his upper lids as he fell asleep.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 9, 2018 from Sleep and Breathing

Nocturnal blood pressure fluctuation and associated influential factors in severe obstructive sleep apnea patients with hypertension (abstract)

Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to sleep-disordered breathing. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in pregnancy is associated with poor pregnancy and fetal outcomes. Oxidative stress caused by intermittent hypoxemia and reoxygenation may impact pregnancy health. We hypothesize that pregnant women with OSA have a pronounced oxidative stress profile.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 7, 2018 from Physician Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

5 Facts that Makes Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea More At-Risk for Death

Research conducted by Yamini Subramani, MD et al [‘Death or near-death in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea: a compendium of case reports of critical complications’] found 5 reasons why the risk of death is higher in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).” … (click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 6, 2018 from Sleep Review

Advanced Positive Airway Pressure Modes Show Promise for PTSD Patients with Comorbid Sleep Apnea

Many obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have a difficult time adhering to CPAP therapy because of expiratory pressure intolerance (EPI), according to a recent study that posits possible solutions.” … (click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 27, 2018 from Dove Press

Obstructive sleep apnea, COPD, the overlap syndrome, and mortality: results from the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

The present study found that COPD and OSA/COPD overlap syndrome were associated with higher all-cause mortality compared with patients without either disease and that OSA did not significantly increase mortality in patients with COPD.” … (click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 22, 2018 from Retina

Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Central Serious Chorioretinopathy and Choroidal Thickness: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with an array of ocular disorders. This systematic review aims to investigate the association of OSA with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) and subfoveal choroidal thickness changes on enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography.” … (click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 21, 2018 from Alaska Sleep Education Center

5 eye issues and sleep disorders: The ocular signs of sleep apnea

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, there are ocular signs that an Ophthalmologist can see which could indicate that you have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).” … (click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 20, 2018 from Times Herald-Record

Sleep apnea is linked to serious health issues

Sleep studies with Doylestown (Pennsylvania) Health’s Sleep Center found each of the Henrys had sleep apnea, a potentially dangerous condition that restricts the airway and stops breathing for several seconds, sometimes hundreds of times throughout the night. The interrupted sleep can lead to an array of health problems, from severe daytime fatigue to heart and liver ailments, sexual dysfunction and sleep-deprived partners.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 15, 2018 from Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Influence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in the Functional Aspects of Patients With Osteoarthritis

It has been demonstrated in recent studies that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most prevalent sleep disorder in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and thus the current study aimed to investigate the influence of OSA on knee extensor torque, pain, stiffness, and physical function in men with low-grade knee OA.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 15, 2018 from Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity is Directly Related to Suicidal Ideation in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

OSA severity in PTSD was directly related to SI. Depression was a significant mediator in the relationship between RDI and SI, with OSA-related intermittent hypoxemia possibly contributing to this relationship only in severe OSA.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 14, 2018 from Markets Insider

Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety Announces Availability of Webinar About Respiratory Compromise — a Potentially Deadly and Avoidable Condition

Risk factors for respiratory compromise include obstructive sleep apnea, older age, obesity and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in addition to receiving opioid administration.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 6-13, 2018 from Diabetes in Control

International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #111: Diabetes and Sleep Apnea Part 1 
International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #111: Diabetes and Sleep Apnea Part 2

Editor-in-Chief Dave Joffe: “This week in part 3 of our clinical text we look at how the pathophysiology of OSA relates to diabetes.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 1, 2018 from News-Medical.net

COPD and Sleep Apnea

As both COPD and OSA affect the individual’s ability to breathe, there are times when both may be present in an individual. This is known as the Overlap syndrome. …Studies conducted by the American Sleep Apnea Association have found that almost half the people with COPD have trouble breathing while sleeping, referring to some level of sleep apnea.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: January 31 2018 from Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology

Prevalence of primary open-angle glaucoma among patients with obstructive sleep apnea

Our objective was to determine primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) prevalence among obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients because the perioperative environment risks further damaging the optic nerve.(click headline for more)

 

 


SLEEP APNEA

PEDIATRICS

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Dateline: March 15, 2018 from ABCNews

For kids who get their tonsils removed, age might matter more than weight, study says

The study looked back at medical records of more than 1,800 children under 6 years old who had the procedures at six different medical centers in New Orleans between 2005 and 2015. Most of these children had a diagnosis of sleep-disordered breathing or obstructive sleep apnea before their tonsils were removed.(click headline for more)

Dateline: March 9, 2018 from HoneyKids

Sleep disorders in children | Night terrors and obstructive sleep apnoea

When it comes to OSA, Dr [Jenny] Tang says parents should be on the lookout for daytime and nighttime symptoms. Daytime symptoms include irritability and the inability to focus at school, while nighttime symptoms include, persistent snoring, frequent wake ups, and difficulty falling asleep or waking up.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 9, 2018 from The Humanist

OPINION: The Moral Responsibility of Dying

In 2013 the California teen had surgery to get her tonsils removed at her mother’s request. She was suffering from sleep apnea that often left her exhausted, which in turn affected her performance in school. It also affected her self-esteem.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 9, 2018 from The Laryngoscope

Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children: What is the Best Management Option?

The treatment of mild OSA in children is controversial. There is a lack of data on the natural history of mild sleep apnea. Furthermore, a poor correlation exists between quality of life (QOL) scores and OSA severity; mild OSA in children may have a significant impact on their general health and well-being. High-quality studies comparing observation, medical management, and surgery for mild pediatric OSA are just beginning to emerge. Many of these studies use varied measures to assess outcomes. Thus, it may be difficult for providers treating children with mild OSA to counsel parents on the optimal treatment for their child.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 2, 2018 from Current Otorhinolaryngology Reports

Adenoidectomy in Children: What Is the Evidence and What Is its Role? (abstract)

Although adenotonsillectomy is the mainstay of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), recent studies have identified that non-obese patients with moderate OSA and small tonsils have comparable benefits with adenoidectomy alone with less complications.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 1, 2018 from The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

Does Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Cause Systemic Microvascular Dysfunction? (abstract)

The aim of this study was to evaluate whether pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) secondary to adenoid hypertrophy causes systemic microvascular dysfunction.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 25, 2018 from Ask the Sleep Doctor via The American Sleep Association

ADVICE COLUMNIST: Ask The Sleep Doctor

My eight-year-old son was recently diagnosed with sleep apnea and our pediatrician recommends an adenotonsillectomy. Our son has problems with behavior and is hyperactive. We were told he has ADHD but our pediatrician says this could be due to sleep apnea. I am afraid of surgery. What do you think?(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 24, 2018 from Healthline column: “Diabetes Mine”

ADVICE COLUMNIST: Ask D’Mine: Sleep Apnea in a Young Type 1?

Sleep apnea is common enough in type 2s [diabetics], and type 2 is common enough in sleep apnea patients that a consensus statement from the International Diabetes Association basically says, if you find one, you should test for the other.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 23, 2018 from Anesthesias & Analgesias

Research Needs Assessment for Children With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Undergoing Diagnostic or Surgical Procedures (abstract)

Recent concerns have been raised about the quality and safety of adenotonsillectomy, a common surgery performed to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. OSA is a risk factor for opioid-related perioperative respiratory complications including those associated with anoxic brain injury or death.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 20, 2018 from Tablet Magazine

Personal Essay: Call It Sleepless

Then, at Zelda’s 4-year-old checkup, her pediatrician noted that her tonsils seemed engorged. An ENT took one look: ‘If Zelda’s tonsils were any smaller, they’d be enormous.’ The bags under her eyes might not be from tiredness, he explained, but swollen adenoids, which usually accompanied large tonsils. These tissues could be blocking her nighttime airflow, causing apnea, leading to wake-ups. He suggested removing the tonsils and adenoids.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 14, 2018 from Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Quality of Life With PAP Therapy for Obese Children

Parents were significantly more likely to conclude that the QOL of their children with both obesity and OSA was less than children with obesity, primarily, or OSA with or without obesity.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 14, 2018 from Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Time to Open Our Eyes? A Challenge to the Role of Polysomnography for Trials in Pediatric Sleep-Disordered Breathing

Approximately 90% of children having adenotonsillectomy for SDB have not had preoperative testing to determine the severity of OSA, and, if tested, approximately half the children waiting for adenotonsillectomy have primary snoring without OSA by polysomnography-measured criteria.(click headline for more)

 

 

Dateline: February 1, 2018 from Otolaryngology

Urinary Leukotriene E4 Levels in Children with Sleep-Disordered Breathing (abstract)

Due to limitations of polysomnography (PSG), novel ways to evaluate pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are needed. Urinary leukotriene E4 (LTE4), an inflammatory marker, has been identified as a potential biomarker for pediatric OSA.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 1, 2018 from SLEEP

Regional brain tissue changes and associations with disease severity in children with sleep-disordered breathing (abstract)

Children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) exhibit behavioral, cognitive, and autonomic deficits, suggestive of neural injury. We assessed whether the tissue alterations resulted from acute or chronic processes, and whether alterations correlated with disease severity.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: January 22, 2018 from Frontiers of Neurology

Altered Regional Brain Cortical Thickness in Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects 2–5% of all children and is associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, resulting in poor school performance. These psychological deficits may arise from brain injury, as seen in preliminary findings of lower gray matter volume among pediatric OSA patients. However, the psychological deficits in OSA are closely related to functions in the cortex, and such brain areas have not been specifically assessed. The objective [of this study] was to determine whether cortical thickness, a marker of possible brain injury, is altered in children with OSA.(click headline for more)

 

 


SLEEP APNEA

WOMEN’S HEALTH

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Dateline: March 14, 2018 from PsychCentral

Gender Differences Found in Brains of Sleep Apnea Patients

A new brain imaging study reveals structural brain changes in patients with sleep apnea as well as distinct differences between males and females with the condition.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 8, 2018 from Providence Journal

Fresh awakening: Women, too, suffer sleep apnea

While research has demonstrated that sleep apnea is more common in men than in women, other studies, including one in 2013 from the UCLA School of Nursing, show that women are less likely to be diagnosed with it. Nearly one in five women experience sleep apnea—but some 90 percent of those who have it have not been diagnosed.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 14, 2018 from Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Effects of Coexisting Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Architecture, Oxygen Saturation, and Systemic Inflammation in Women

Sleep and health in women is an ongoing community-based study in Uppsala, Sweden. Three hundred eighty-four women ages 20 to 70 years underwent overnight polysomnography and completed questionnaires on airway diseases and sleep complaints.(click headline for more)

 

PREGNANCY

Dateline: March 8, 2018 from Alaska Sleep Education Center

Women with Sleep Apnea: Why Women are Less Often Diagnosed with OSA

Pregnancy can increase the risk of developing OSA. Untreated OSA in pregnant women can lead to complications during pregnancy including high blood pressure, enlarged heart, pulmonary blood clots, more frequent preeclampsia, neonatal intensive care unit admissions, and cesarean delivery.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 24, 2018 from Sleep and Breathing

Oxidative and carbonyl stress in pregnant women with obstructive sleep apnea (abstract)

Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to sleep-disordered breathing. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in pregnancy is associated with poor pregnancy and fetal outcomes. Oxidative stress caused by intermittent hypoxemia and reoxygenation may impact pregnancy health. We hypothesize that pregnant women with OSA have a pronounced oxidative stress profile.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 15, 2018 from Sleep Review

For Pregnant Women, Researchers Develop Calculator to Provide Sleep Apnea Probability

Snoring, older age, and obesity may increase a pregnant woman’s risk for sleep apnea, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study, which appears in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, was supported by NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 14, 2018 from Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Gestational Diabetes With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This study assessed the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in obese pregnant females with GDM and OSA.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 12, 2018 from Contemporary Ob-Gyn

Obstructive sleep apnea in pregnancy—what you need to know

In the largest prospective study published to date, among the 3,132 nulliparous women who completed objective testing for sleep apnea, prevalence of sleep apnea was estimated to be 3.6% in early pregnancy and increased across gestation with rates as high as 26% in the third trimester. That study confirmed the findings of Pien, et al, who found an increase from 10.5% in the first trimester to 26.7% in the third trimester among a group of women who underwent overnight polysomnography at 2 time points in pregnancy.(click headline for more)

 

MENOPAUSE

Dateline: January 30, 2018 from The Sleep Doctor

Managing sleep and health in menopause

Research shows post-menopausal women are at greater risk for OSA compared to pre-menopausal women. And they’re more likely to experience more severe sleep apnea.(click headline for more)

 

 


SLEEP APNEA

LIFESTYLE & PERSONAL CHALLENGES

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Dateline: March 15, 2018 from Lung Institute

How Altitude Impacts Your Lung Health

Another condition related to sleeping at higher altitudes is called periodic breathing. This is a type of sleep apnea in which you quit breathing during sleep for 5 to 20 seconds. Individuals that suffer from periodic breathing also report that their sleep is less restful and lower in quality.(click headline for more)

Dateline: March 12, 2018 from The Better Sleep Guide

Cost of Sleep Apnea

The majority of medical costs for OSA are driven by diagnosis expenses and funding the first year of treatment. Approximately $12.4 billion is spent annually on diagnosing and treating sleep apnea for 5.9 million U.S. adults.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 9, 2018 from North Carolina Social Security Disability Attorney

Can you get disability benefits from sleep apnea?

According to the Social Security’s Office’s Listing of Impairments, sleep apnea is covered in section 3.10 titled ‘Sleep Related Breathing Disorders.’(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 8, 2018 from Why We Snore

6 Signs Sleep Apnea Is Affecting Your Driving (before You Have an Accident)

Sleep apnea can increase your risk of car accidents five times. You may not notice all the signs of heart disease or metabolic disorders, but there are often good clues to show when sleep apnea is affecting your drive. Watching for these signs can help you get treatment before you have a serious accident.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 5, 2018 from Digitizd

Can I Travel with a CPAP Machine? Tips and Advice

When you own a CPAP machine or you’re considering buying one, one concern is how can you travel on a business trip, to see relatives or on a prolonged vacation with it? The issue comes partly down to your mode of transport. If you’re flying by air, there are different considerations to when taking your own vehicle all the way or traveling on an Amtrak train, a Greyhound bus, or another transport option. Let’s look at your different options and considerations when traveling with CPAP equipment.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: March 5, 2018 from Slate

The New Roseanne Trailer Has Familiar Faces, Familiar Places, and a Horrifying Sleep Apnea Mask

It turns out sleep apnea has struck the patriarch of the Conner family in the years since the show last aired on ABC in 1997. Which is not great, but technically a step in the right direction, given that Goodman’s character died from a heart attack in the series finale.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 22, 2018 from Golf News Net

Jessica Korda looks different after jaw surgery, but her golf game didn’t change one bit

The surgery was required to correct massive overbite, which limited her ability to chew food and partially caused her to develop sleep apnea. It was ruining her life.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 22, 2018 from MedicalXPress

Study points to risk of future sleep breathing problems in college football players

Studies with professional football players have also shown that sleep apnea, a serious breathing disorder during sleep common in older men, is also common in professional players, and in particular, in linemen.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 20, 2018 from MyApnea.org

Learning Together

At SLEEP 2017, the MyApnea.org patient leaders, with help and guidance from Dr. Susan Redline, organized a ‘Learning Lounge’ in hopes of being able to start a conversation with sleep providers.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 19, 2018 from Sleep Review

Spoonful of Sugar Stylish CPAP Bags

Inspired by a stylish sister with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) who carried around her BiPAP device in a Lord & Taylor shopping bag, inventor Hindy Ginsberg wanted to create designer bags for medical equipment.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 15, 2018 from Charlotte Observer

NFL Hall of Famer’s dream house on Lake Norman up for auction

After the house in Cornelius is auctioned off, they plan to donate $50,000 to Reggie White Foundation programs that provide dental appliances and help educate people about treatment options for sleep apnea.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 15, 2018 from Sleep Review

Sizing Up Heat and Moisture Exchangers for Travel CPAP Devices

Humidifiers that utilize patients’ exhaled breath offer a solution to dry airways and sinuses when using mini-positive airway pressure machines—albeit with some limitations.(click headline for more)

 

 


SLEEP APNEA

POLITICS, LAW & REGULATIONS

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Dateline: March 8, 2018 from Bureau of National Affairs

Fired 911 Operator With Sleep Apnea Didn’t Show Need for Help

A Wisconsin 911 operator who says she suffered from sleep apnea failed to show she was unlawfully fired due to a disability or because she needed to take a medical leave of absence, a federal appeals court decided.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 19, 2018 from Alaska Sleep Education Center

Presidential Sleep Apnea

These former presidents didn’t have the benefit of modern medicine or living in an era where CPAP machines were around to help treat their sleep apnea.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 16, 2018 from ROI

OPINION: Sleep apnea testing would keep us all safer

Last week, the National Transportation Safety Board reported that the probable cause of the 2016 NJ Transit crash at the Hoboken rail terminal, in which a train accelerated as it was coming into the station, was “the engineer’s fatigue resulting from his undiagnosed severe obstructive sleep apnea.” The crash killed a woman who was standing on a platform, injured more than 100 others and caused $6 million in damage.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 15, 2018 from Above the Law

OPINION: Shocking! Shocking! Fired For Sleeping On The Job — And Awarded Damages!

I think it is safe to say that sleep apnea is a covered disability.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 15, 2018 from Progressive Railroading

NTSB to FRA: Require railroads to screen for sleep disorders

To the FRA, the NTSB reiterated the following safety recommendations:

  • require railroads to medically screen employees in safety-sensitive positions for sleep apnea and other sleep disorders; and
  • develop and enforce medical standards that railroad employees in safety-sensitive positions diagnosed with sleep disorders must meet to be considered fit for duty.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 14, 2018 from Truck News

OOIDA appealing court ruling on sleep apnea suit

[Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association Acting President Todd] Spencer says the addition of regulations and guidelines for screening for the sleep disorder hold drivers hostage when it comes time to get a physical.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 7, 2018 from Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

Former Detroit man convicted of murder files appeal in federal court

Licata contends in his federal appeal that anger and hostility are among the symptoms of sleep apnea and that his defense lawyers failed to bring his condition to court.(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 6, 2018 from The New York Times

Failure to Screen for Sleep Apnea Led to 2 Recent Train Crashes

After finding that the engineers in two recent commuter train crashes in the New York metropolitan area suffered from sleep apnea, federal investigators questioned the Trump administration’s reversal on requiring tests for the disorder. At a hearing in Washington on Tuesday, the chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board said he was ‘mystified’ by the withdrawal last year of a proposed federal rule on screening train crews for sleep apnea. The safety board officially concluded that the engineers’ fatigue and their employers’ failure to screen for sleep apnea caused the two similar crashes — one in Hoboken in late 2016 that killed one person and another in Brooklyn three months later. ‘The public deserves alert operators,’ said the chairman, Robert L. Sumwalt. ‘That’s not too much to ask.’(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: February 1, 2018 from American Sleep and Breathing Academy

Recommendations for the NTSB for Improved Safety in Transportation Industries Related to Fatigue, Daytime Sleepiness, Poor Sleep Hygiene, Undiagnosed and Untreated OSA, as well as Improvement in Technological Utilization

The Federal Aviation Administration, The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, The US Coast Guard, the Federal Railroad Administration, and National Highway Safety Administration, to name a few, have over a decade of recorded accidents and disasters shown to be related to human error caused by fatigue resulting from poor sleep, overwhelming caused by undiagnosed and untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA).(click headline for more)

 

Dateline: January 28, 2018 from Sleep Review

Couple Charged with Illegally Selling CPAPs

The defendants did not ask the buyers to produce prescriptions for the devices. Ramey and Aderhold did not provide instructions to the buyers regarding the safe use of the stolen medical devices.(click headline for more)

Sleep News Monthly || March 2018 Special Edition: Sleep Apnea

Do you have sleep apnea?

Thank you for the vote!

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